Workplace Health and Safety: Who’s Responsible?

Workplace Health and Safety

Workplace Health and Safety: Who’s Responsible?

Employers or Safety Representatives

Employers must consult employees on health and safety issues. Consultation must be either direct or through a safety representative that is either elected by the workforce or appointed by a trade union.

It is an employer’s duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business. Employers must do whatever is reasonably practicable to achieve this.

This means making sure that workers and others are protected from anything that may cause harm, effectively controlling any risks to injury or health that could arise in the workplace.

Employers have duties under health and safety law to assess risks in the workplace. Risk assessments should be carried out that address all risks that might cause harm in your workplace.

Employers must give you information about the risks in your workplace and how you are protected, also instruct and train you on how to deal with the risks.

Employers must consult employees on health and safety issues. Consultation must be either direct or through a safety representative that is either elected by the workforce or appointed by a trade union.

Employers have a legal duty under the Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations (HSIER) to display the approved poster in a prominent position in each workplace or to provide each worker with a copy of the approved leaflet ‘Health and safety law: What you need to know that outlines British health and safety law.’

Employee

All workers are entitled to work in environments where risks to their health and safety are properly controlled. Under health and safety law, the primary responsibility for this is down to employers. Health and safety is about stopping you getting hurt at work or ill through work. Your employer is responsible for health and safety, but you must help.

Workers have a duty to take care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by your actions at work. Workers must co-operate with employers and co-workers to help everyone meet their legal requirements .

As a worker, if you have specific queries or concerns relating to health and safety in your workplace, talk to your employer, manager/supervisor or a health and safety representative.

Agency and Temp Workers

All workers are entitled to work in an environment where the risks to their health and safety are properly controlled. If you are an agency or temporary worker then your health and safety is protected by law and employment businesses (agencies) have a duty to make sure that they follow it.

What employers must do for you
  1. Decide what could harm you in your job and the precautions to stop it. This is part of risk assessment.
  2. In a way you can understand, explain how risks will be controlled and tell you who is responsible for this.
  3. Consult and work with you and your health and safety representatives in protecting everyone from harm in the workplace.
  4.  Free of charge, give you the health and safety training you need to do your job.
  5. Free of charge, provide you with any equipment and protective clothing you need, and ensure it is properly looked after.
  6. Provide toilets, washing facilities and drinking water.
  7. Provide adequate first-aid facilities.
  8. Have insurance that covers you in case you get hurt at work or ill through work. Display a hard copy or electronic copy of the current insurance certificate where you can easily read it.
  9. Work with any other employers or contractors sharing the workplace or providing employees (such as agency workers), so that everyone’s health and safety is protected.
What YOU must do
  1. Follow the training you have received when using any work items your employer has given you.
  2. Take reasonable care of your own and other people’s health and safety.
  3. Co-operate with your employer on health and safety.
  4. Tell someone (your employer, supervisor, or health and safety representative) if you think the work or inadequate precautions are putting anyone’s health and safety at serious risk.

 

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Share this post